Author Archives: stiganielsen

The sign for MAKE:lab

To test the accuracy of the plasma cutter mounted on the KR150 industrial robot arm, we did the sign for MAKE:lab

Although its rough on the edges, it proved a nice easy and efficient way to cnc-cut large sheets of metal.

 

The 3D Voronoi puzzle

This is an old little puzzle I did to test my 3D printer.

I did two versions, first a 30 piece, which took a few weeks to solve, then an 8 piece to give to friends so they would actually maybe solve it.

It is challenging to start but it gets easier as any puzzle.

Find full 3d models and other at my Thingiverse post

The Lego Game

Take your box of Lego and sort a number of exact similar piles. The number of piles should match the number of players. I recommend storing the pieces in separate bags for later use.

Now each player has  a handful of pieces, say there are 16 in each pile for example.

1: Now the first player makes a little arrangement of 4 selected pieces from his own pile. While doing so he hides his pieces behind a standing open book or in his lap under the table.

2: When all players are ready, he shows the arrangement in the middle of the table.

3: At the moment the arrangement is shown the other players can copy the arrangement as fast as possible. But!

4: At any moment any of the players copying can say stop, and everyone has to stop building.

5: The copies are now compared to the original and minus points are given for misplaced pieces.

6: Points are noted, and the next player makes an arrangement now with 8 pieces. (repeat from 1)

Finally: The points are summarized such that the weight of points are relative to the number of pieces.

Notes: It can be troublesome to calculate points, so give and take a bit or just rate the figures quickly looking for similarity, then throw points by the paper-sissor-stone method: showing a number of fingers at them simultaneously (one figure at the time – fairplay)

-The fun part here is to just build arbitrary lego figures and train the 3D perception.

Bike -> E-Bike conversion – mechanical transmission

A onedayproject to convert my bike to e-bike.

Well the one day was making the transmission and it was running 50km/h in the afternoon (in a private area) -the more careful design of battery packs and safety systems came later.

It is powered by around 40-50V running a BLDC motor of 290Kv and rated max 1800W. The transmission is gear ratio of around 1/11 (as I recall) -but still the motor runs too slow at low speed driving.

It very lightweight and cheap to build but you need a BLDC controller and I recommend the VESC designed by Benjamin Vedder.

I also recommend having brakes that are stronger than the motorsetup, so the fail happens to the mechanics – not the driver..

For additional details just ask or check out my Thingiverse post

Electric Boat Motor

My diesel motor broke down, so I designed and installed  an electric motor drive.

Great about this project is the way I used different prototyping techniques to fab the timing pullys, and the alu frame.

And even more great is that compared to the diesel engine which had 4 separate liquid systems and electric system – this has just one electric system, and it doesn’t pollute or require any maintenance.

It charges on solar panels 20V boosted up to 60V for the 4x12v batteries (series) that provide the electric power. -I have even been sailing on sun alone 😉

V.1 10kW BLDC 150KV 45-52V 86Ah direct drive – not working 🙂

V.2 10kW BLDCmotor 150KV 45-52V 86Ah timing belt over cast pullys. Worked ok but at low rpm for the motor, causing high current draw.

V.2 25kW BLDC motor 50KV 45-52V 86Ah same timing belt setup, this works perfect from 150 w just driving the boat in harbour without current or strong wind up to approx 2000W in canals etc.

If you are interested in more details, just ask.

I will try to get some shots from the current installation.. to show the pulley setup.

 

Mixed Substrate Computation – Sensor Based Artificial Cognition for Architectural Design and Modification

My PhD-thesis is published and pressed as book of 288 pages. Find the full text here

Abstract

A mutual relationship exists between activities and their physical environment. Change of circumstances in the built environment cause change of activities, and vice versa, change of activities cause changes of physical environment. How does information originating from activities influence the environment? And how does the environment provide relevant information for activities to take place?

Digital and material computation has — within architectural design — been used extensively to strengthen the capacity to build novel and more geometrically enhanced structures. However on large and small physical as well as long and short temporal scale there is only poor understanding the activities and phenomena taking place in the built environment. In particular, a lack in understanding of the relationships between changes in physical conditions and changes of activities. The rationale behind implementations and modifications of the built environment is constituted by many actants simultaneously at play, mainly based on human heuristics, sensemaking and semantics.

Digital computation can be combined with material, morphological and other types of computation to create models of the past, current and future scenarios. Here this concept is coined !Mixed !Substrate !Computation and relies heavily on successful !embodiment and !embodied !computation.

A technology is needed for tracing, extracting and computing both embodied memory and data from activities residing in the environment on different spatial and temporal scales.

This thesis presents a set of methods that combine sensors and algorithms to a novel technique of perceiving activities and phenomena over time.. Consequently, a kind of artificial cognition is demonstrated able to detect recurrent phenomena and in turn perform predictions in seemingly chaotic situations.

This discovery can bring about a paradigm shift in design, taking us from our current situation where architects, designers and planners predict and design for future needs using their present day point-of-view, to a situation where design tools are able to learn from complex situations and can predict future needs autonomously.

This capacity for perception and prediction contributes to the current discourse on mixed material and digital practices within architectural design — filling an increasingly widening gap between material and formal computation: the concept of embodiment. The idea of integrating body and soul—or the physical and the abstract—is a concept which is key for understanding the relationships between phenomena and matter.

Find the full text here

direct download link